September 20, 2009

La Vendemmia- Schiacciata con L'uva




In Italy, each region has seasonal dishes which one can make once a year. September is the wine harvest, vendemmia, and in Tuscany we make the Schiacciata con l'uva.

A simple bread dough, often enriched with a rosemary-infused olive oil, is rolled out into a top and bottom layer and filled with Concord grapes, here called Uva Fragola, making a natural jam baked right into the bread.


The best recipes ooze with syrup! At my Florence bakery near the market, Ivana Braschi makes a fresh fig schiacciata which is incredible. Now that I have found an abandoned fig tree near my house in the countryside. I will try making my own.



Here is my recipe from my cookbook-

Schiacciata con l’Uva Tuscan Grape bread

1/4 cup olive oil
1 rosemary branch

2 lbs red wine grapes, Concord grapes or blueberries

1 lb flour

1 cake fresh yeast
1/2 cup sugar

honey

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

  • Heat rosemary branch in olive oil. Remove rosemary.
  • Dissolve yeast in 1 cup warm water.
  • Place flour in a large bowl and add the yeast mixture. Stir to mix. Add the rosemary-scented oil and 4 Tbs. sugar.
  • Knead dough until smooth.
  • Place in greased bowl.
  • Cover and let rise until doubled.
  • Divide dough in half. Roll out into a thin rectangle.
  • Place on greased cookie sheet.
  • Top with 1/2 of the grapes.
  • Sprinkle with sugar and drizzle with oil.
  • Cover with other half of dough, rolled out as before. Seal edges by folding bottom edge over top.
  • Press down on dough to crush grapes.
  • Cover top with remaining grapes.
  • Crush these too, to release juices.
  • Sprinkle with sugar and drizzle with honey.
Bake at 350 degrees until golden. Baste, if possible, with any juices.

14 comments:

  1. oh wow this looks amazing and i beat so moist

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow! This looks wonderful! I love the oozing syrup!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Lots of grapes abound in LA right now too, so I will be making this soon! Grazie!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Mmmm, that last photo, divine!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Your schiacchiata looks amazing. I had a go at making it a while back but it wasn't nearly as oozy as yours, I did however have to substitute for different grapes:
    http://culinarytravelsofakitchengoddess.wordpress.com/2009/04/08/a-hidden-tuscan-treasure/

    ReplyDelete
  6. I find if you don't have the right grapes, blueberries ( even frozen) give you the same color, and juiciness.

    Be generous with the sugar- as it creates the juices.

    I like it less bread-y so use a larger pan!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I may have missed something (that happens!), but do you use seedless concords? Or do you seed the grapes first?

    ReplyDelete
  8. I love your site. Makes me feel like I have had a little excursion to a place with a slower pace. This recipe looks amazing. And step by step, not to difficult to try. Best Wishes, Marie

    ReplyDelete
  9. I love your site. Makes me feel like I have had a little excursion to a place with a slower pace. This recipe looks amazing. And step by step, not to difficult to try. Best Wishes, Marie

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hey, Marie, you recommended, I came!

    This blog is just beautiful, it made me feel like baking today!

    This recipe seems so simple, and it must taste delicious!

    Adam (mrelife.blogspot.com)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Oh beautiful, beautiful bread. I love foods that are special to a season or holiday or family event. It just enhances them. And now that the concord grapes are here (I'm going to try growing them - in MN), I shall try this.

    ReplyDelete
  12. what gorgeous grapes, and a wonderful way of preparing bread, I am enjoying strolling through this blog

    ReplyDelete
  13. Anonymous12:01 AM

    Had to have used seedless grapes. Would love to try this but my grapes have seeds ;-(

    ReplyDelete
  14. All of our grapes have seeds! we use wine grapes and just spit!

    ReplyDelete